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Static guards dont mean asleep (Read 21435 times)
Reply #41 - 19. May 2018 at 17:41

laurie8781   Offline
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I believe there is a difference between falling asleep accidentally on the job and coming to do a static shift preparing to sleep in the car for the shift!
I have fallen asleep during a static shift looonnngg ago when I started security, I had done big hours in my day job and then looked after a rubbish tip where I had no transport to do patrols. I was told to stay in the office and chuck the heater on as it was a cold winters night.
I work as a supervisor for a civil construction company and I  organised a guard for site to watch power transformers over the weekend. I had guards booked from the security company I work for. I went past the job site on the sunday about 0830, shift change was 0600, the guard was asleep in his car, passenger seat laid back, blankets on the windows, pillow and blanket on him. I stood there and took video of him for about 5 mins or so right next to the car! I woke him up by banging on the car roof, and told him, As the client, I was not impressed! He denied everything and said he had permission from his boss to cat-nap! As the a long time senior guard from the company we both worked for, I had him sacked. I rang the boss and told him what had happened and the boss confirmed my decision. If he had just fallen asleep in the later part of the shift, I may have gone easier on him. If it was at night time and not during the day. As it was AND he came PREPARED to fall asleep during shift, this is why I had him fired.
 
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Reply #40 - 13. May 2018 at 23:51

tywo   Offline
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k9handler wrote on 19. Oct 2009 at 09:53:
Security comes down to common sense.If you have any you will go
a long way.But these days ppl only do security because they cant get a job.

I agree with you
 
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Reply #39 - 24. Apr 2015 at 22:05

Donald Raggs   Offline
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Sleeping while on duty is such an important issue that it is addressed in the employee handbook in some workplaces.
 
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Reply #38 - 08. Aug 2011 at 11:14

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spike wrote on 08. Feb 2011 at 20:52:
Hi Guys

The first thing you don't do is inform the client, as the employer may lose contract and all may lose their job.

Lets look at sleeping on the Job working 12 hours around the clock.

Reason has it under the Work Place Health & Safety that an employee can work 12 hour shifts on a four on for off, after that Fatugue take's over.

Never blame a security officer for being asleep on the job unless you know the full cirsumstances. One could find that the employer, or the client is partly to blame for the Officer being asleep.

There are many unfair dismissals in the State and the Federal Jurisations where employees have had wins against being sacked for being, allagedly asleep on the job.

If an employee is asleep on the job it's an unsafe job site, now lets look at the cause rather than pointing the fingure.

At the end of the day any security Officer who works at night, either, Patrol, Gate, Static or other who say that they haven't nodded off is a f...  lier, for example everyone who contribute to this site would have nodded off while on duty working, a 12 hour night shift.

If you are going to dob a fellow Security officer in, you need to have a perfect record as your name will be shit (and you will be targted) if you are proven wrong and most employers will sack the dobber if he/she has made a false aligation. Why because you have caused a cost in unfair dismissal or other costs.

Guys this is not the web page to dob each other, how about attacking the cause, the employers or more importantly the clients who hold your employers at ransom.

Do not trust the clients.

Think about it.

Regards

Totally agree. I dont sleep basically because Im required to constantly patrol so opportunity really.

I do occasionally hullucinate, have walking microsleeps and autopilot (military call it droning) which is imo much worse than sleeping on the job. Last month I was a second away from walking in front of a train. Dog saved me. Train driver is supposed to do an inch manuever and sound horn but maybe was sleepy too Wink

If your bagging out security for sleeping on the job, you mustnt have experienced true fatigue, its that thing that causes you to fall asleep doing 110kph on the freeway.  Its not something you intentionally do and happens to everyone given the right conditions.
 
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Reply #37 - 01. Aug 2011 at 05:43

Arthur   Offline
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I've used Dr Drew Dawson's fatigue management calculations for a long time and they help to measure just how tired you really are. Getting other people to get out the paper and pen and do the calculations can be tricky, though Wink. One of the boys at work turned up with a phone ap that uses Dawsons fatigue calculator and I found this site that provides apps, windows versions and even training for fatigue management.

Being pretty tight I think I'll stick with the free pen and paper calculations.

Because Dawson is a leading expert, aparently the calculations are able to be used in court as a defence. Very handy for people operating machinery, medical professionals, and probably security professionals.

http://www.fatiguecalculator.com.au/PRODUCTS-SERVICES/Products/Products.asp
 
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Reply #36 - 31. Jul 2011 at 11:32

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ParanoidPatrolman wrote on 20. Jul 2011 at 18:25:
i was so scared afterwards and all i need to do now when im sleepy at work is think of that moment, never slept since.



Once fatigue has set in it doesn't matter how you attempt to combat the effects your autonomic system will ALWAYS win (and shut you down for self preservation), this is why drowsy drivers die on our roads every year...

The message is simple... "don't burn the candle at both ends" Wink 
 

"Folks who think profiling has no place in the world we live and believe that all folks have good intentions are called victims of violent crimes." - David Burnell
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Reply #35 - 20. Jul 2011 at 18:25

ParanoidPatrolman   Offline
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We had a bloke in my old company who got caught sleeping three times.

The first time he pulled a shift watching a broken door to a harvey norman store, the patrolman found him with the seat back, pillow and blanket, he'd even put up newspaper on his windsheild to block out light from the street lamps.

Second time he was working a gatehouse shift and they found him dozing on his seat with a book in his hands, at 10am.

Third and final time they found at the same gatehouse shift asleep in the dunny. Boss sacked him on the spot and finished the shift himself.

But even after that he still tried to put in a claim for unfair dismissal, haha.


I have fallen asleep on shift only once, my third or fourth shift, the guard who was supposed to relieve me after my 12 hour shift had a car accident on the way to work and nobody could cover it, so i had to work a double 12 hour shift, at about the 19 hour mark a patrolman found me passed out leaning against a wall, he didnt make a big deal about it because they knew i had pulled a hard day, but still, i was so scared afterwards and all i need to do now when im sleepy at work is think of that moment, never slept since.
 
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Reply #34 - 16. May 2011 at 22:31

Major Function   Offline
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It is not just night shifts where you can fall asleep. I had a job one summer sitting in my unairconditioned car in front of a clients house. I remember watching a car coming down the street and then I opened my eyes and the client's wife was walking away from my car.
Oh shit, panic, how long had she been there! I jumped out of the car and asked her did she want to see me. She had wanted to give me a drink of water.
The temperature was in the high 30s so my car even with the doors open was over 40.
 
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Reply #33 - 08. Mar 2011 at 15:18

Spectre   Offline
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No matter your background nor personal desire if you haven't had adequate rest (prior to your shift) you may reach a point where you're physically unable to remain 100% awake... it's an autonomic response called a Micro-sleep and it can effect Security workers as easily as Transport industry employees or anyone else for that matter.


BTW Welcome to the forums ColinV  Wink





« Last Edit: 08. Mar 2011 at 15:19 by Spectre »  

"Folks who think profiling has no place in the world we live and believe that all folks have good intentions are called victims of violent crimes." - David Burnell
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Reply #32 - 01. Mar 2011 at 22:53

ColinV   Offline
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Static Gaurd, it can be one of the hardest to comply with, one has to stay alert and awake.  Fortunately I have not fallen asleep on a shift, however I have many years of Millitary under my belt and falling asleep there is something you do not repeat twice.  

I keep on foot patrol, at which time I keep an eye open for any maintenance requirements, safety issues, lights that have blown and needs replacement.  I continually go over various emergency senarios in my head.  I always keep my own Daily Occurance Log, keep info as time of foot patrols, areas covered, condition of premises at time, maintenanc and safety issues.  This also covers me if there are any concerns.   Smiley
 
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Reply #31 - 27. Feb 2011 at 16:47

MoonMan   Offline
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Mountain Dew works best for me!

Also, I hold "interviews" with myself.  I act as if I'm the person interviewing and being interviews.  I come up with several scenarios.  For example, I just made the game-winning shot and I'm being interviewed on live TV.  Sometimes, I come up with a situation of me being a hero of some sort.

I also like to keep myself moving in place.  Tapping my foot helps.

Of course, I do all of this in my mind.   Cool
 

The best lock picking guide can teach you how to secure homes and properties.
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Reply #30 - 09. Feb 2011 at 07:27

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I knew of a security company that required each static guard to send a text message to control on the hour.   It was a simple stored message on the phone which just gave the officer's name.   It was a management tool such as the 'dead man' switches on passenger trains.   If control did not get the message within the required timeframe they rang the officer and if this failed they sent a mobile patrol around to investigate.   Too many missed text messages meant some disciplinary action was taken.

Security companies owe a duty of care to their employees to see that they are safe and not lying in a pool of blood for the remainder of the shift.

Having said that there remains a health and safety issue of hazards of working night shifts.
 

Ah! Working in Security where finding the real thief could be your employer. Now is the time to check your super account.
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Reply #29 - 09. Feb 2011 at 00:23
billy   Guest

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Hi spike
          yes i fully agree thats why i wont give specifics on companies,workers or the location.I am not here to make the industry any worse than it already is just raising awareness and adding a valid situation to the topic..there could be many reasons why a gaurd could fall asleep but the main point was the very public location where passing public could see clearly also their own vulnerability by having car door open. Think about this for a moment......Front page local paper....SECURITY OFFICER BASHED WHILE SLEEPING ON JOB AND CLIENT ROBBED....this is not something i want to read or hear about. not to mention all the legal ramifacations would his or her boss admit to allowing power naps when their faceing a lawsuit???..... thanks.....billy.......
 
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Reply #28 - 08. Feb 2011 at 22:22

SecOps   Offline
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I was specifically talking about billy's case. That sort of response from a provider is just plain wrong.
 
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Reply #27 - 08. Feb 2011 at 20:52

spike   Offline
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Hi Guys

The first thing you don't do is inform the client, as the employer may lose contract and all may lose their job.

Lets look at sleeping on the Job working 12 hours around the clock.

Reason has it under the Work Place Health & Safety that an employee can work 12 hour shifts on a four on for off, after that Fatugue take's over.

Never blame a security officer for being asleep on the job unless you know the full cirsumstances. One could find that the employer, or the client is partly to blame for the Officer being asleep.

There are many unfair dismissals in the State and the Federal Jurisations where employees have had wins against being sacked for being, allagedly asleep on the job.

If an employee is asleep on the job it's an unsafe job site, now lets look at the cause rather than pointing the fingure.

At the end of the day any security Officer who works at night, either, Patrol, Gate, Static or other who say that they haven't nodded off is a f...  lier, for example everyone who contribute to this site would have nodded off while on duty working, a 12 hour night shift.

If you are going to dob a fellow Security officer in, you need to have a perfect record as your name will be shit (and you will be targted) if you are proven wrong and most employers will sack the dobber if he/she has made a false aligation. Why because you have caused a cost in unfair dismissal or other costs.

Guys this is not the web page to dob each other, how about attacking the cause, the employers or more importantly the clients who hold your employers at ransom.

Do not trust the clients.

Think about it.

Regards
 
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