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Mobile Patrol Officers (Read 13005 times)
Reply #14 - 20. Sep 2018 at 19:38

ginashalom   Offline
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Donald Raggs wrote on 20. Apr 2015 at 16:14:
The security officer who arrive at your organisation,building or key points of your site in a security vehicle and patrol to ensure all is in order. This means that any potentially vulnerable areas of your site can be regularly checked and your overall security is improved.

Dude well said, by the way, It's on our shoulders to make sure that the environment of our site is fully cooperative to them Cheesy.

Regards,
Ginashalom. Smiley
 
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Reply #13 - 20. Apr 2015 at 16:14

Donald Raggs   Offline
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The security officer who arrive at your organisation,building or key points of your site in a security vehicle and patrol to ensure all is in order. This means that any potentially vulnerable areas of your site can be regularly checked and your overall security is improved.
 
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Reply #12 - 03. Sep 2011 at 20:31

braine   Offline
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Gina wrote on 16. Jul 2009 at 12:15:
A friend of mine works as a mobile patrol officer for a shire.  The things that go on there is unbelievable.  I would wonder what kind of security they are providing with these goings-on:  

•      Party in security office for birthday and invite outsiders.
•      Officer leaving the job, has party and drinks until red in the face on last day at work.
•      Extra training done to learn by-laws and refuses to do the job they have been trained in.
•      All patrol officers meeting for dinner leaving shire with no patrols for that time.
•      Discrimination of patrol officer with Psoriasis, other officers will not use the car he uses.
•      The formation of cliques and so not working with people outside the clique, not even responding when called for back-up.
•      Patrol officers in security office and call centre person (who incidentally is also in the clique) watching where other patrol officer is on GPS (regular occurrences).
•      Calls sent out by call centre person by mobile phone to person in clique instead of two-way and message data transmission.
•      No passing on of important messages to incoming shift.
•      Officers coming into work late.
•      No routine at work, patrol officers doing anything they want in any order.
•      Hierarchy in shire not taking the initiative and taking control of the in-house security.


I have gone through the information and Its really good to read.
 
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Reply #11 - 03. Jun 2011 at 21:35

Major Function   Offline
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One of the patrol jobs I had was in a touristy area, caravan parks, marinas and hotels. To complete 1 patrol and do a full check of every client took 3 hours, we had to do three checks in a night but the biggest set back was one client required us to be on site for 1 hour 4 times a night.

I started with 10 hour shifts and could not do it so I approached the ops manager who gave me an extra hour so I was getting 11 hours and the other guard were getting 10. I was still unable to complete all the patrol and sometimes I would stay at the 1 hour client in my own time. Then we got two extra clients so the ops manager increased the other guards shifts by 1 hour.  

But I still liked the work and I also like the company.
 
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Reply #10 - 21. Oct 2009 at 14:26

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The industrial site is large by comparison and our only motive in forming our partnership was to maintain our income and not be driven to frustration.   We only intend to remain a small concern. When I was working for the security company my employment was dependent on having a current driving licence. You think that driving at night that you would be safe when breaking road rules to complete your schedule. I did not count on speed cameras operating at night. Along with other fines over the period my licence looked as though it would be suspended if I ended up with one more fine. Working for our old employer did not last long. Things were tight for a while when we started out. Credit cards got a bashing. You get clients by understanding what they want and not what you can sell them. Being close when an alarm goes off means short response time. A lot of our clients only had alarm monitoring and response. They tell you ‘why have alarms that instantly tell you something is wrong and it takes a patrolie 20 to 30 minutes to get there’. A lot of our clients pay us a retainer just to answer alarms. Most theft from companies is done by employees or ex employees. Doing a thorough and proper security check of the premises can stop this. A common way of thieving is for the employee to move items from the store to the industrial bin which is usually stored outside the alarm zone. They then return at night and retrieve the items without any alarms going off. Having your clients store the bins in the building overnight helps foils this type of crime.  Believe me if you can demonstrate to the client that what he is paying for is getting done then they are prepared to pay.
 
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Reply #9 - 19. Oct 2009 at 14:10

SecOps   Offline
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Wouldn't that limit your potential growth? Or is the industrial estate massive?

Also how come your current employer still employs you while you are taking all his clients?

 
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Reply #8 - 19. Oct 2009 at 12:29

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This might interest you. A mate and I were working as patrolies for a reasonably well known company. We did the same run on opposing 4 day on and 4 day off shift. The company had a number of clients in a large industrial park and we had the same problems as described above. We worked out by the time the patrol got to the site after an alarm the action was over and the client had little or no evidence of who did it to give to police. After being screwed by the company trying to complete overloaded runs we decided we could go into business for ourselves and offer the client a better service. We formed a partnership and got licenced. Our trading name was the name of the industiral park we intended to service i.e. XYZ Industrial Park Security and started to canvas the businesses in the park. Our pitch was that we would only service clients in the park either on individual patrols or just alarm response but this was conditonal on us getting enough clients to make it viable.   When we obtained enough clients interested in the scheme, we worked for our company on our days off while still working for our employer. This was a bit full on until we attracted enough clients to make a living then gave away our jobs.

What we offer our clients is short response time to alarms as well as thorough physical security patrols of their business. It helps to get clients when you can get a reference from the business next door. We also offer complimenary security audits to companies who are not our clients. Most companies do not know how insecure their businesses are outside the alarm zones, holes in fences, unlocked vehicles etc. We do things our way, on solo patrol we carry a weapon and have purchased a dog which didn't graduate from the air force training. we each agreed we were prepared to assist on a callout on our days off if need be. Because we are in the park continually, we are able to observe and log suspicious vehicles which helps if something happens.
 
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Reply #7 - 15. Oct 2009 at 14:36
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You're right Jarrad, it is a vicious circle, not helped by the transient nature of much of this industry.  With a lot of the shiftwork casual, officers come and go and training can come down to a line or two on a run sheet. Its a shame that everything comes down to the bottom line of the almighty dollar when a little more time spent training staff could give better results for everyone.
 
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Reply #6 - 15. Oct 2009 at 04:15

SecOps   Offline
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I can sort of see why a lot of employers don't up the wages though, especially when other companies are out under-cutting prices.

I agree its a vicious cycle
 
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Reply #5 - 14. Oct 2009 at 15:37
Raven   Guest

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Overloaded patrols are part of the issue and when you do it all the time it seems you never get a shift that isn't flat out and stressful.  Clients who require higher numbers of patrols per night seem to be the ones who end up having missed calls, and when you're stretched thin what else can you do? Information between Operator and Patrol can be a problem too, and if the Security Co doesn't use their own patrols there is yet another avenue by which information can be lost or distorted. Better pay would help those of us who want to do the job right, but employers won't up wages.  Angry
 
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Reply #4 - 13. Oct 2009 at 12:19
Jarrad   Guest

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It doesn't help when you have other companies in the area offering patrols at half cost of your company.

Have a company in my area offering patrols for less then $1 a night to take away our current clients, problem is by doing this our employer shortens the run enough so he is not out of pocket, however a 11hr patrol run is now a 7hr patrol run with a 1hr unpaid break.

The amount of clients and the distance traveled each night hasn't changed that much, however some of the clients were decent $$$
 
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Reply #3 - 13. Oct 2009 at 10:46

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There is a large industrial park near me with well known industries.   I was talking to a copper who said that at present there is no security company patrolling the area.   A lot of companies used to employ security companies to patrol their businesses but were not satisfied with the service.   The contracts called for the patrol officer to do physical security checks of the premises but this was not carried out in full.   It probably was a result of the patrol officer trying to get through a heavy schedule.   Result - poor service = lost contracts = lost jobs.   Too many security companies trying to screw each other.
 

Ah! Working in Security where finding the real thief could be your employer. Now is the time to check your super account.
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Reply #2 - 12. Oct 2009 at 21:38
billy   Guest

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as a patrol officer myself i am sick of these patrollies who fail to fullfill there obligations to the client most times unbeknown to the client.then there's the companies that encourage this by over loading their runs to be impossible to complete not to mention if you get an alarm call turns out to be a B & E.time lost waiting for the police,keyholder and giving a report to the police your whole night is stuffed and the boss doesnt care to help out.you have to make up the time the best way you can because you know you will not be paid overtime if you get in late. if this is not the way its done in most small companies as this is the way it happened where i was working i would love to hear from you.
 
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Reply #1 - 12. Oct 2009 at 17:43
Raven   Guest

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This is appalling to say te least. While aware that Patrols can be incredibly lazy there are many who do the job right and its the bad Patrols such as this that give the impression our industry lacks credibility.  I work in a Control Room and am perpetually frustrated by Patrols who don't check, report NOD then the client rings to tell us there was a B&E and why weren't told?

I'm fortunate to have a good Boss and if these Patrolies worked for us they'd be instantly dismissed.
 
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16. Jul 2009 at 12:15

Gina   Offline
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A friend of mine works as a mobile patrol officer for a shire.  The things that go on there is unbelievable.  I would wonder what kind of security they are providing with these goings-on: 

•      Party in security office for birthday and invite outsiders.
•      Officer leaving the job, has party and drinks until red in the face on last day at work.
•      Extra training done to learn by-laws and refuses to do the job they have been trained in.
•      All patrol officers meeting for dinner leaving shire with no patrols for that time.
•      Discrimination of patrol officer with Psoriasis, other officers will not use the car he uses.
•      The formation of cliques and so not working with people outside the clique, not even responding when called for back-up.
•      Patrol officers in security office and call centre person (who incidentally is also in the clique) watching where other patrol officer is on GPS (regular occurrences).
•      Calls sent out by call centre person by mobile phone to person in clique instead of two-way and message data transmission.
•      No passing on of important messages to incoming shift.
•      Officers coming into work late.
•      No routine at work, patrol officers doing anything they want in any order.
•      Hierarchy in shire not taking the initiative and taking control of the in-house security.
 

Gina
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